August 26, 2020

Crystal Muench works every week to arrange the floral donations from our community partner, Trader Joes, into beautiful flower arrangements for our patients. What drew you to hospice volunteering? My childhood best friend’s daughter died of a rare type of brain cancer at the age of five. During this, I was exposed to the work […]

March 26, 2020

Klamath Falls, Oreogon Hi Everyone, Yesterday morning as I drove through an empty downtown Klamath Falls-void of people and cars alike—giant snowflakes fell from the sky and gently fell across the empty streets, and for a moment it was like I was in some dystopian movie, half expecting a helicopter to land and guys in […]

December 26, 2019

Klamath Falls, Ore. – Oregon Tech students work to comfort hospice patients. Students in the Bio-Health Sciences Club has been making blankets for High Desert Hospice for several years. Student Marissa McGinnis is a member of the club. “This year we wanted to make it bigger and better than all the rest of the years.” The […]

November 20, 2019

Karen and Kay are our dynamic duo who use their friendship and shared faith to serve hospice patients as a team. Karen has a background in hospice, having spent part of her career managing a hospice office in Cumming, GA. “My husband passed away on hospice, and it was not a good experience. Very little […]

September 11, 2019

Klamath Falls, Ore. – High Desert Hospice of Klamath Falls hosted a butterfly release Saturday afternoon. Nearly 200 people showed up at the Moore Park Pavilion to remember friends and loved ones recently lost. “What we’re doing today, is our non-profit High Desert Hospice Foundation is doing a butterfly release.”  Explains Barbara Golden of High […]

April 10, 2019

A patient of ours wanted to try Rocky Mountain Oysters before he died. He expressed this wish to his Hospice CNA and she immediately began making connections within our community to see it through. Within a matter of about a week, the patient was enjoying authentic, Rocky Mountain Oysters, harvested from a local farm by […]

April 10, 2019

Our Foundation recently received a Foundation request for A relatively young patient who had relocated to Heart of Hospice’s service area to live with her daughter who would be able to care for her full time; the patient’s spouse was overwhelmed at home, being the primary caregiver for a special needs child.  Although the patient’s […]

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26/Aug/2020


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26/Mar/2020

Yesterday morning as I drove through an empty downtown Klamath Falls-void of people and cars alike—giant snowflakes fell from the sky and gently fell across the empty streets, and for a moment it was like I was in some dystopian movie, half expecting a helicopter to land and guys in hazmat suits all pile out of it. I was struck by how I couldn’t remember any natural cataclysm/ war/ B.S. like the COVID-19 that has changed things worldwide in such a short time. We’ve had pandemics before, but in our age of communication, the response has been swift relative to times past when people communicated by horse or by telegraph. In essence, our world shut down in 10ish days!

In fact, history shows every generation faces their own foe that can show the worst in humanity (to varying degrees, of course): war, economic depression, displacement from homeland, genocide, natural disasters, and those who seek to profit off it all; and now we have a new one that presents its own challenges and risks. So as the Good Book says, “we must be wise as serpents and as gentle as doves.”

I was reminded then of what Mr. Rogers (yes, that Mr. Rogers) once famously asked his mother when he was a child upon watching the violence surrounding the Civil Rights movement on the news. Her response was simple and elegant: “Look for the helpers.” Look for those who see the welfare of neighbors as well as their own families. Look for those who are willing to be there for someone else who knows how to walk in another person’s moccasins.

Then I started to see the helpers. They are everywhere if you look. Simple as being available to give their time, kindness, and love to another. Generations past didn’t think themselves extraordinary; they did what they could with what they had, and they just helped. Everyday people once hid Jews from Nazis or took up arms against them. Everyday women served as nurses and aids on the front lines of the Civil War. During the depression, everyday people looked after their neighbors to make sure people got fed, at great expense to their own dinner plans. Everyday people volunteered to take the children of strangers out of London and shelter them for years in their country homes and farms in rural England during Hitler’s relentless civilian bombing. None of them saw themselves as superheroes; they just helped someone with what they had. We see it happen every time there is a disaster on the news or a great need demands we put aside our everyday plans.

In our everyday way, you go into a world with another new risk, and you will do what is in your heart; make things better for others. You also stand ready, fearful and poised for whatever is to come as we have yet to see just how this will all play out. I am comforted knowing that generations past felt similar ways in adversity and still sought to make things better for others—and God saw them through it just as He will see us through this.

So let’s go help. Lend your strength to others today, then go home to love your families and rest, because tomorrow we get to help some more. Practice your spiritual disciplines and rest, so you are strong inside and out. Breathe. Read and listen to materials that feed your soul. You have your knowledge, training, and experience and are amazing at what you do—literally, people tell me every day how much they appreciate you out there, especially now.

So while some may seek to corner the market in toilet paper and hand sanitizer, we are blessed to work and to be there for others. It is awesome to watch you all work, selflessly assessing and reassessing the situation, and communicating PT changes and alike, calmly and as a team. Stay the course, my friends. May the Lord be the wind in all your sails today and return you to port safely tonight.

Shalom,

Dave Loew, MDiv
High Desert Hospice

 

 


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26/Dec/2019

Students in the Bio-Health Sciences Club has been making blankets for High Desert Hospice for several years. Student Marissa McGinnis is a member of the club.
“This year we wanted to make it bigger and better than all the rest of the years.”

The club decided to make a blanket for each hospice patient.
“We weren’t really sure that the number was, and we asked and found out it was 70 patients.” McGinnis explains. “And so, we talked it over, and we were like, ‘let’s do it – let’s go for it.”

With help from Joann Fabrics, the community, and their adviser, they achieved their goal.
And the results are appreciated.

“Patients just love them.” Notes Barbara Golden of High Desert Hospice. “They’re bright and cheery, and they cheer them up, and they’re warm and fuzzy – and they’re so appreciated.”

“Hearing these stories, they really appreciate the small things.” Notes student Christian Gomez. “A blanket – it can really change someone’s life.”

The blankets will soon be comforting hospice patients.
“It’s just one of those things at Christmas that just makes you feel good.” Golden reflected.
Gomez agrees. “It warms my heart to be able to help people like this.”

 

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Nearly 200 people showed up at the Moore Park Pavilion to remember friends and loved ones recently lost.

“What we’re doing today, is our non-profit High Desert Hospice Foundation is doing a butterfly release.”  Explains Barbara Golden of High Desert Hospice.  “We’re reading off all the names that we have lost.”

Joyce Wagner lost her husband Scott to cancer nearly a year ago.

Wagner says she appreciates the care provided by Hospice.  “Honestly, just having the people available 24 hours, it’s really nice.  They’re just always a kind shoulder, and it’s really helpful.”

The event is an emotional one.

“The objective is to just come together and see the people that we serve.”  Notes Golden.  “And just build up our community, and just do something in honor of people, loved ones that we have lost.”

The butterflies were specially delivered from Georgia.

High Desert Hospice hopes to make this an annual event, with a butterfly release held the first weekend after Labor Day.

 

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2019 Inspiring Hospice Foundation